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ANTENTOP- 02- 2003, # 003

The Wireless Power Transmission System

 

i = q/s and q = is

q = 31.6amps x 2.16 x 10-7 s

q = 6.8x10-6 coulombs

If 100 watts is assumed for the detector circuit, the current at 50 ohms is:

I = square root (100/50) = 1.4 amps

and the charge:

q = 1.4 amps x 2.16 x 10-7 = 3 x 10-7 coulombs

Using Coulomb's law to calculate the force on each charge separated by the given distance:

F=(q1q2)/(4p e 0r2)

F=(3x10-7)(6.8x10-6)/(4p (8.9 x 10-12)(6.4x104)2)

F = 4.5x10-12 nt. = 4.5x10-7 dynes

Assuming, finally, that the detector circuit uses a 100 microfarad capacitor, the force of the field will result in a voltage as such:

e = square root (F/(C x 107))

e = square root ((4.5 x 10-7)/(100x10-6x107))

e = 21 x 10-6

A change of 21 microvolts would be well above the 5 microvolt level required for a radio receiver to capture a signal from the electrostatic detector circuit. It should be remembered, too, that Tesia worked at higher energy levels than used in this example. He used hundreds of amps at lower frequencies(more charge) and potentials of millions of volts.

This analysis of Tesla's wireless transmission method is preliminary, but does indicate the type of field of force and distance calculations that have to be made in order to have a successful electrostatic communication system. Issues dealing with the optimum frequencies, the earth as a dielectric, and the function of the earth's charge in power transmission have to be investigated. This is in addition to the questions yet to be discovered. However, it is clear that 100 years ago Nikola Tesia began a branch of communication technology that differs significantly from that in use today.

If you have questions to the author, please, do not shame email to:

 

onichelson@post.harvard.edu

Notes

1. Wait, James R., "Propagation of ELF Electromagnetic Waves and Project Sanguine/Seafarer," IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, vol. OE-2, no. 2, April 1977, pgs. 161-172.

2. Corum, James F., and Corum, Kenneth L., "Disclosures Concerning the Operation of an ELF Oscillator," Tesla '84: Proceedings of the Tesla Centennial Symposium, Dr. Elizabeth Rauscher and Mr. Toby Grotz, editors, International Tesla Society, Inc.. Colorado Springs, 1985, pgs. 41-49.

3. Tesla #787,412: page 1, lines 53 - 56.

4. Ibid., page 3, lines 35 -41.

5. Tesla, Nikola, "Experiments With Alternate Currents of Very High Frequency and Their Application to Methods of Artificial Illumination" (1891), reproduced in Nikola Tesia: Lectures * Patents* Articles. published by the Nikola Tesla Museum, Nolit, Beograd, 1956, pg. L-42.

6. Ibid.,pg. L-43.

7. ________, "On Light and Other High Frequency Phenomena (1893), ibid., pg. L-121.

8. Ibid. L-127, emphasis added.

9. Ibid., pg. L-138.

10. Gilstrap: Column 2, lines 34-48.

11. Curry: Column 1, lines 21-28.

12. Curry: Column 1, lines 44-48.

13. Curry: Column 4, lines 8 - 38.

14. Curry: Columns 5-6.

15. Curry: Column 7, Imes 35 - 75 to column 8 line 2.

Nicola Tesla

 

 

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